Item #15498 William Russell Special Correspondent of The Times. Roger Hudson, Max Hastings: Introduction.
William Russell Special Correspondent of The Times
William Russell Special Correspondent of The Times
William Russell Special Correspondent of The Times
William Russell Special Correspondent of The Times

William Russell Special Correspondent of The Times

London: Folio Society, 1999. Maps drawn by Denys Baker. Limited Edition of a non-disclosed number. Hardcover in a slipcase.

No Flaws or Blemishes but minimal shelf handling to the slipcase; Book is flawless; Gift Quality. 9.5 inches tall; 426 pages with an index; Monochrome portrait frontispiece and 27 plates. Typeset in Monotype Modern by Gloucester Typesetting Services. Printed at The Bath Press, Bath, on Ibis Wove Paper and bound by them in full buckram, printed and blocked with a design by David Eccles.

Fine / No Dust Jacket As Issued. Item #15498

Background Information:
Initially sent by editor John Delane to Malta to cover British support for the Ottoman Empire against Russia in 1854, Russell despised the term 'war correspondent' but his coverage of the conflict brought him international renown, and Florence Nightingale later credited her entry into wartime nursing to his reports.

The Crimean medical care, shelter and protection of all ranks by Mary Seacole was also publicized by Russell and by other contemporary journalists, rescuing her from bankruptcy. Russell was described by one of the soldiers on the frontlines thus: 'a vulgar low Irishman, who sings a good song, drinks anyone's brandy and water and smokes as many cigars as a Jolly Good Fellow. He is just the sort of chap to get information, particularly out of youngsters.'

This reputation led to Russell's being blacklisted from some circles, including British commander Lord Raglan who advised his officers to refuse to speak with the reporter. His dispatches were hugely significant; for the first time the public could read about the reality of warfare. Shocked and outraged, the public's backlash from his reports led the Government to re-evaluate the treatment of troops and led to Florence Nightingale's involvement in transforming battlefield treatment.

In the 1868 General Election Russell ran unsuccessfully as a Conservative candidate for the borough of Chelsea. He retired as a battlefield correspondent in 1882 and founded the Army and Navy Gazette. Russell was knighted in May 1895. He was appointed a Commander of the Royal Victorian Order (CVO) by King Edward VII on 11 August 1902, - a dynastic order handed out by the King without government interference. During the investiture, the King reportedly told Russell 'Don't kneel Billy, just stoop'. [wiki]

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