Item #17187 [19th Century English Marriage Law] The Report of Her Majesty’s Commission on the Law of Marriage Relative to Marriage with a Deceased Wife’s Sister examined in a Letter to Sir Robert Harry Inglis. Alex J. Beresford Hope.
[19th Century English Marriage Law] The Report of Her Majesty’s Commission on the Law of Marriage Relative to Marriage with a Deceased Wife’s Sister examined in a Letter to Sir Robert Harry Inglis
[19th Century English Marriage Law] The Report of Her Majesty’s Commission on the Law of Marriage Relative to Marriage with a Deceased Wife’s Sister examined in a Letter to Sir Robert Harry Inglis

[19th Century English Marriage Law] The Report of Her Majesty’s Commission on the Law of Marriage Relative to Marriage with a Deceased Wife’s Sister examined in a Letter to Sir Robert Harry Inglis

London: James Ridgway, 1849. Third Edition, Revised and Enlarged.

Disbound from wraps; catalogue number in the upper corner on the title page; last page has edge chipping not affecting the text. The glued bindings are firm; text is clean and evenly age-toned.

Seemingly scarce in the original.  When searching institutions most, if not all reference OCLC, 16825155/ Reproduction of original from Harvard Law School Library

Subjects: Consanguinity; Sociology; Marriage Law

Very Good / No Dust Jacket As Issued. Item #17187

Marriage to a deceased wife's sister stirred considerable controversy in 19th century England due to prevailing religious and societal norms. Victorian society grappled with religious, moral, and social considerations. Notably, the influential Church of England vehemently opposed such unions, significantly shaping public sentiment and legislative deliberations.

These debates unfolded within both religious circles and the wider populace, spanning the mid-1800s. Attempts to alter the law and permit such marriages encountered staunch opposition from traditionalists upholding established moral and religious beliefs.

It wasn't until the enactment of the Deceased Wife's Sister's Marriage Act in 1907 that the practice gained legality in England. This legislation permitted men to wed their deceased wife's sister, provided that the sister was not the catalyst for the marital breakdown.

Price: $35.00